Last edited by Gujin
Thursday, July 23, 2020 | History

4 edition of Ceramic production and distribution in the southeastern Maya periphery found in the catalog.

Ceramic production and distribution in the southeastern Maya periphery

late classic painted serving vessels

by Marilyn P. Beaudry

  • 381 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by B.A.R. in Oxford, England .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Central America,
  • Central America.
    • Subjects:
    • Maya pottery.,
    • Mayas -- Commerce.,
    • Indian pottery -- Central America.,
    • Indians of Central America -- Commerce.,
    • Central America -- Antiquities.

    • Edition Notes

      Other titlesCeramic production & distribution.
      StatementMarilyn P. Beaudry.
      SeriesBAR international series ;, 203
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsF1435.3.P8 B42 1984
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxi, 335 p. :
      Number of Pages335
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2580385M
      ISBN 100860542602
      LC Control Number85127886

      Beaudry, Marilyn Patricia Production and Distribution of Painted Late Classic Maya Ceramics in the Southeastern Periphery. Ph.D. dissertation. Los Angeles: University of California. Inter.   Sharer, Robert J. The Prehistory of the Southeastern Maya Periphery. Current Anthropology – Sharer, Robert J. The Prehistory of Chalchuapa, El Salvador, Vol. 3: Pottery and : Jeb J. Card, Marc Zender.

      Ting, Carmen (). The production and exchange of moulded-carved ceramics and the ‘Maya Collapse. Mo S&T Library: Journal of Archaeological Science. Arnold, Dean E. (). Social Change and the Evolution of Ceramic Production and Distribution in a Maya Community. Mo S&T Library: University Press of Colorado. Reents-Budet, Dorie (). Created Date: 9/12/ PM.

      Ancient Maya State, Urbanism, Exchange, and Craft Specialization: Chipped Stone Evidence from the Copan Valley and the La Entrada Region, Honduras / Estado, urbanismo, intercambio. Along the northern coast of Quintana Roo, Mexico, prehistoric ceramic usage included a variety of unslipped forms. During field excavations at the Maya coastal site of Vista Alegre, Drs. Jeffrey Glover and Dominique Rissolo recovered a high volume of sherds comprising a number of vessel type-varieties and forms. Vessel fragments collected from the Vista Alegre assemblage are comprised largely Author: Joseph Horne.


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Ceramic production and distribution in the southeastern Maya periphery by Marilyn P. Beaudry Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Ceramic production and distribution in the southeastern Maya periphery: late classic painted serving vessels. [Marilyn P Beaudry]. This significant study was the first to attempt to deal with the Periphery as a coherent unit. Unique in its comparative presentation of Copan and Quirigua and in the breadth of information on non-Maya sites in the area, The Southeast Maya Periphery consists largely of previously unpublished data.

Book Description: How and why do ceramics and their production change through time. Social Change and the Evolution of Ceramic Production and Distribution in a Maya Community is a unique ethno-archaeological study that attempts to answer these questions by tracing social change among potters and changes in the production and distribution of their pottery in a single Mexican community between.

Ceramic Production and Distribution in the Southeastern Maya Periphery: Late Classic Painted Serving Vessels. Beaudry, Marilyn P. Ceramic Production and Distribution in the Southeastern.

In The Evolution of Ceramic Production Organization in a Maya Community, Dean E. Arnold continues his unique approach to ceramic ethnoarchaeology, tracing the history of potters in Ticul, Yucatán, and their production space over a period of more than four follow-up to his work Social Change and the Evolution of Ceramic Production and Distribution uses narrative to trace Cited by: 5.

Utilitarian ceramic vessels form the bulk of artifact assemblages in the Maya Lowlands, but little is known about their production beyond the likelihood that they were made in a domestic context without elite by: 5.

Follow Marilyn P. Beaudry and explore their bibliography from 's Marilyn P. Beaudry Author Page. Book Description: InThe Evolution of Ceramic Production Organization in a Maya Community, Dean E.

Arnold continues his unique approach to ceramic ethnoarchaeology, tracing the history of potters in Ticul, Yucatán, and their production space over a period of more than four follow-up to his workSocial Change and the Evolution of Ceramic Production and Distributionuses.

Ceramic production and distribution in the Southeastern Maya periphery: Late Classic painted serving vessels. B.A.R. International Series Oxford: British Archaeological by: The first systematic analysis of ceramic figurines from multiple regions of the Southern Maya Lowlands, this book explores the construction of the Late Classic period Maya state by considering how figurines found in household refuse deposits mirror the relationships the state had with households and individuals.

"Local production, non-local production, and distribution: Usulutan and Usulutan-like negative painted ceramics in Nicaragua." in Patterns and Process: A Festschrift in Honor of Dr.

Edward V. Sayre, edited by Zelst, L. van., – Essay. In the first millennium B.C., peoples speaking Mayan languages settled in agricultural villages across the Yucatan Peninsula. They began constructing monumental buildings, sculpting in various media, and creating durable containers out of fired c vessels nourished in both life and death: they held food and drink for daily life, but also offerings in dedicatory caches and.

In The Evolution of Ceramic Production Organization in a Maya Community, Dean E. Arnold continues his unique approach to ceramic ethnoarchaeology, tracing the history of potters in Ticul, Yucatán, and their production space over a period of more than four decades.

This follow-up to his work Social Change and the Evolution of Ceramic Production and Distribution uses narrative to trace. Understanding the organization of ancient ceramic production and distribution patterns can provide archaeologists a means of exploring past economies.

Recent studies have shown that petrographic analysis can be operationalized to detect variability in production recipes, distribution of production groups across a landscape, and even producer-specific material : Alessandra Villarreal.

The socio-economic nature of Late Postclassic (AD c. ) Maya society is not well understood and still eludes researchers. Through a combination of analytical methods, including petrographic, chemical and experimental, examination of surface features and ethnographic analyses, this study reconstructs ceramic production technology, seeking regional patterns in the technology applied to.

The Maya Ceramic Book of Creation The Trials of the Popol Vuh Hero Twins Displayed on Classic Maya Polychrome Painted Pottery First they entered the dark house.

[ ] but they didnt burn the torch - instead, something that looked like fire was substituted. This was the tail of the macaw, which looked like a torch to the sentries. (Tedlock This paper explores a particular ceramic type, Vista Alegre Striated, an assumed locally produced utilitarian cooking vessel, recovered at the coastal Maya site of Vista Alegre during the Terminal Classic period (AD ).

This study investigates the variations present within this type and how these differences inform production practices at the site and in the : Christian Holmes. The formative ceramic sequence of Cuello, Belize / Laura J. Kosakowsky --The ceramic sequence of Kichpanha: seasons / Kathryn V.

Reese and Fred Valdez, Jr. --Putting together the pieces: Maya pottery of northern Belize and central Peten, Guatemala / Arlen F. Chase and Diane Z.

Chase --Terminal classic to early historic period vessel. Abstract. The Classic period Maya lived on a peninsular cul-de-sac geographically isolated from other Mesoamerican groups.

Although their cultural uniqueness, manifested particularly in their writing system, is often overblown in both scholarly and popular accounts, nevertheless the geographical position of the Maya Lowlands—surrounded by water on three sides and by a chain of mountains on Cited by: Request PDF | IDENTIFYING DOMESTIC CERAMIC PRODUCTION in the MAYA LOWLANDS: A CASE STUDY from UXBENKA, Belize | Utilitarian ceramic vessels form the.

Bill, Cassandra Ruth. Patterns of Variation and Change in Dynastic Period Ceramics and Ceramic Production at Copán, Honduras. Tulane University, Viel, Rene. Evolucion de la Ceramica de Copan, Honduras.

Tegucigalpa, Instituto Hondureño de Antropología e Historía, Longyear, John M. Copan ceramics: a study of Southeastern Maya pottery. n. An example of Mayan vase of the Late Classical Period.

Copan, Honduras. Source: Wikipedia The latest study, which involved the analysis of the crystal structure of the ash, has now ruled out one of the main candidates as the source – the Ilpango volcano in El Salvador, according to a report in Live this has only further deepens the mystery.The Maya had specific techniques to create, inscribe, paint, and design begin creating a ceramic vessel the Maya had to locate the proper resources for clay and present-day indigenous Maya, who currently live in Guatemala, Belize and southern Mexico still create wonderful ceramics.

Prudence M. Rice provides a look at what the current Guatemalan Maya use today for clay.